Artículos con la etiqueta "Charlie Daniels"



Music · 10/18/2018
"Long Haired Country Boy", is a song written and performed by the Charlie Daniels Band and released on their 1974 album Fire on the Mountain. It was first released as a single in April, 1975 and was re-released as a single in January, 1980.
Music · 09/21/2018
"The Devil Went Down to Georgia" is a song written and performed by the Charlie Daniels Band and released on their 1979 album Million Mile Reflections. The song is written in the key of D minor. Vassar Clements originally wrote the basic melody an octave lower,[citation needed] in a tune called "Lonesome Fiddle Blues" released on Clements' self-titled 1975 album on which Charlie Daniels played guitar. The Charlie Daniels Band moved it up an octave and put words to it. The song's verses are close
Music · 06/23/2018
"The Devil Went Down to Georgia" is a song written and performed by the Charlie Daniels Band and released on their 1979 album Million Mile Reflections. The song is written in the key of D minor. Vassar Clements originally wrote the basic melody an octave lower,[citation needed] in a tune called "Lonesome Fiddle Blues" released on Clements' self-titled 1975 album on which Charlie Daniels played guitar. The Charlie Daniels Band moved it up an octave and put words to it. The song's verses are close
Music · 02/04/2018
The fiddle tune "Orange Blossom Special", about the passenger train of the same name, was written by Ervin T. Rouse in 1938. The original recording was created by Ervin and Gordon Rouse in 1939. It is often called simply The Special. It has been referred to as the fiddle player's national anthem.
Music · 02/04/2018
"The South's Gonna Do It", is a song written and performed by the Charlie Daniels Band and released on their 1974 album Fire on the Mountain. The song uses a clever play on words to promote Southern rock music. The notion that "the South shall rise again" was a familiar sentiment and rallying cry for disaffected Southern whites after the American Civil War. The song co-opts that sentiment, but uses the statement to celebrate Southern rock acts contemporary to the song itself. The "it" that the S