Artículos con la etiqueta "don gibson"



Music · 09/12/2018
"Sweet Dreams" or "Sweet Dreams (of You)" is a country ballad, which was written by Don Gibson. Gibson originally recorded the song in 1955; his version hit the top ten of Billboard's country chart, but was eclipsed by the success of a competing version by Faron Young. In 1960, after Gibson had established himself as a country music superstar, he released a new version as a single. This version also charted in the top ten on the country chart and also crossed over to the Billboard Hot 100, where
Music · 06/26/2018
"Blue Blue Day" is a 1958 single by Don Gibson. "Blue Blue Day" went to number one for two weeks on the Country & Western Best Seller charts and remained on the charts for a total of six months.The song also was Don Gibson's second of four Top 40 entries, where it peaked at number twenty.
Music · 06/03/2018
"Sea of Heartbreak" is a song written by Paul Hampton and Hal David and recorded by Don Gibson in 1961. The song reached #2 on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks chart. The song has been covered by a number of artists, perhaps most famously by Johnny Cash. Cash's daughter, Rosanne Cash, covered the song in 2009 as a duet with Bruce Springsteen on her album, The List. British pop group The Searchers recorded a version in 1964 for their album It's The Searchers. The Everly Brothers covered
Music · 05/26/2018
May 26, 1965.Don Gibson records "A Born Loser" in a morning session at Nashville's RCA Studio B Donald Eugene Gibson (April 3, 1928 – November 17, 2003) was an American songwriter and country musician. A Country Music Hall of Fame inductee, Gibson wrote such country standards as "Sweet Dreams" and "I Can't Stop Loving You", and enjoyed a string of country hits ("Oh Lonesome Me") from 1957 into the mid-1970s.
Music · 05/23/2018
"(I'd Be) A Legend in My Time" is a song written and recorded by Don Gibson in 1960. It appeared as the B-side of his hit "Far Far Away", from the album Sweet Dreams. Gibson re-recorded the song on the 1972 album Country Green. Roy Orbison covered the track for his 1961 album Lonely and Blue, and recorded a second later version which was featured on his 1967 tribute album to Gibson, Roy Orbison Sings Don Gibson. A 1973 rendition by Sammy Davis Jr. became an Adult Contemporary charts, reaching #
Music · 04/17/2018
"Oh Lonesome Me" is a popular song written and recorded in December 1957 by Don Gibson with Chet Atkins producing it for RCA Victor in Nashville. Released in 1958, the song topped the country chart for eight non-consecutive weeks. On what became the Billboard Hot 100, it peaked at No. 7. It was Gibson's only Top 10 hit on the pop chart. Its B-side was "I Can't Stop Loving You", which peaked at No. 7 on the C&W Jockey charts and became a standard song about unrequited love. The vocal backings on
Music · 04/14/2018
"Oh Lonesome Me" is a popular song written and recorded in December 1957 by Don Gibson with Chet Atkins producing it for RCA Victor in Nashville. Released in 1958, the song topped the country chart for eight non-consecutive weeks. On what became the Billboard Hot 100, it peaked at No. 7. It was Gibson's only Top 10 hit on the pop chart. Its B-side was "I Can't Stop Loving You", which peaked at No. 7 on the C&W Jockey charts and became a standard song about unrequited love.The vocal backings on b
Music · 03/19/2018
Donald Eugene Gibson (April 3, 1928 – November 17, 2003) was an American songwriter and country musician. A Country Music Hall of Fame inductee, Gibson wrote such country standards as "Sweet Dreams" and "I Can't Stop Loving You", and enjoyed a string of country hits ("Oh Lonesome Me") from 1957 into the mid-1970s.
Music · 03/15/2018
Donald Eugene Gibson (April 3, 1928 – November 17, 2003) was an American songwriter and country musician. A Country Music Hall of Fame inductee, Gibson wrote such country standards as "Sweet Dreams" and "I Can't Stop Loving You", and enjoyed a string of country hits ("Oh Lonesome Me") from 1957 into the mid-1970s.
Music · 03/15/2018
"Sweet Memories" is a song by Mickey Newbury, brought to success by Andy Williams. The song reached #4 on the adult contemporary chart and #75 on the Billboard chart in 1968. Other versions include those by Willie Nelson, Brenda Lee & Ricky Van Shelton, Ray Charles & Mary Ann, The Everly Brothers, and Roy Orbison.