Artículos con la etiqueta "traditional country"



Music · 08/26/2018
Faron Young Plays It's Four In The Morning on The Hee Haw Show 1973 "It's Four in the Morning" (also known as "Four in the Morning") is a song made famous by country music singer Faron Young. Released in 1971, the song was his first No. 1 hit single on the Billboard Hot Country Singles chart since 1961's "Hello Walls."The song was written by Jerry Chesnut. The song was the title track to his 1971 album and became one of his best-known hits. It was also a major smash in the UK, somewhat rare for
Music · 06/21/2018
"Just Good Ol' Boys" is a 1979 novelty single by the duo of Moe Bandy and Joe Stampley. "Just Good Ol' Boys" would be a number one single and the most successful collaboration of Moe Bandy and Joe Stampley. The single stayed at number one for one week and spent a total of eleven weeks on the country chart.
Podcasts · 05/23/2018
In this episode we're featuring the debut record of a fresh-faced 27-year-old Oklahoma boy singing good country music: "Garth Brooks" (Self Titled) (1989). From the look on his face on the front cover of this album, I'd say he didn't have any clue of the fame about to come his way on the strength of this release - and fame did come, sure enough. This record achieved diamond certification (sales of 10 million plus in the USA alone) and catapulted Garth's career into the stratosphere, turning him
Podcasts · 05/16/2018
In this episode, we're featuring a rodeo-themed album from ex-bull rider Red Steagall and his road band The Coleman County Cowboys: "For All Our Cowboy Friends" (1977). The inclusion of The Coleman County Cowboys over the A-class Nashville pickers that Red was using at this period in his career adds authenticity: world-champion fiddler Snuffy Elmore dragging the bow, James Wood on steel and Red's younger brother Danny Steagall on guitar add road miles to the album's sound. The artwork alone is a
Podcasts · 05/10/2018
In this episode, we're featuring a Columbia concept album from "The Master" - Ray Price: "Love Life" (1964). Released after another highly successful thematic album in 1963's "Night Life", our feature album continues the tradition - this time, it's all songs about love. Loving, losing, heartbreak, euphoria, disappointment - the highs and lows of one of humankind's most relatable subjects - Price has a song for everyone's "Love Life" on this release, and he's fine voice to boot. Backed by some of
Podcasts · 05/02/2018
In this episode, we're featuring a Columbia concept album from "The Master" - Ray Price: "Love Life" (1964). Released after another highly successful thematic album in 1963's "Night Life", our feature album continues the tradition - this time, it's all songs about love. Loving, losing, heartbreak, euphoria, disappointment - the highs and lows of one of humankind's most relatable subjects - Price has a song for everyone's "Love Life" on this release, and he's fine voice to boot. Backed by some of
Podcasts · 04/18/2018
In this week's episode, we're featuring a gritty example of 21st century honky tonk from The Reeves Brothers: "King Of Country Music" (2017). Sons of an Arkansas traditionalist who found success in Southern California, Matt & Cole Reeves have forged a sound reminiscent of something that may have been heard on an AM radio in about 1975: grimy, no frills barroom country music. Their rough-hewn product belies the fact that both brothers were in their twenties when they recorded this album, but Cole
Podcasts · 04/04/2018
In this episode, we're featuring an album that captures Faron Young at his very best: "Step Aside" (1970). Released at a particularly busy time for Young on Mercury Records, "Step Aside" was crammed in amongst seven full length studio albums in four years, but that fact hasn't affected the output one bit. The Singing Sheriff is in the best voice of his career: mellow yet animated, soaring yet wonderfully controlled, and all with a healthy dose of twang. As you'd expect, it's fiddles and steel, t
Music · 04/03/2018
Jim Ed Brown sings Looking Back To Se , on Grand Ole Opry. This song is by Jim Ed Brown and appears on the album Jim Ed Sings The Browns (1969) and on the compilation album The Essential Jim Ed Brown and the Browns (1996).
Music · 03/27/2018
Johnnie & Jack were an American country music duo composed of Johnnie Wright (1914–2011) and Jack Anglin (1916–1963). The duo became members of the Grand Ole Opry in the 1940s.Between 1951 and 1962, the duo released several singles on the RCA Victor Records label, including their version of "Goodnite, Sweetheart, Goodnite" which peaked at No. 4 on the Best Seller charts,and the No. 1 "(Oh Baby Mine) I Get So Lonely". Following Anglin's death in a car accident in 1963, Wright became a solo artist

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