Artículos con la etiqueta "when the cowboy sings"



Music · 10/15/2019
Song written by Hank Williams (so it is attributed, but there are doubts), was recorded on June 13, 1952, and was released on July 19, 1952, for the MGM label. The song reached number one on country charts on 6 September 1952 Jambalaya, would be included on the album, Honky Tokin ‘(MGM 1954). With a melody based on the song “Gran Texas” by Cajun, since the original melody of the song is a basic element of the Cajun culture. “Grand Texas” is a song about a lost love, a woman who left the singer
Music · 10/15/2019
A song written and recorded by Hank Williams jr, recorded on September 24, 1979 and produced by Jimmy Bowen, for the Elektra label, which would be included on the album of the same name, which would go on sale in November 1979. The song would reach number two on US charts, and number one on Canadian charts, single and number five on album charts. The record was certified platinum, the first of Hank Jr.’s career “Whiskey Bent and Hell Bound” is one of those southern rock ballads, country rock, o
Music · 10/15/2019
I'm Moving On, a song written by Hank Snow and recorded by Hank Snow (The Singing Ranger) And His Rainbow Ranch Boys for the RCA label, was recorded on March 28, 1950, on Brown Radio Productions, 240 1/2 4th Ave. North, Nashville, TN, Hank was accompanied in the session by: Hank Snow (vocal and guitar), Joseph Talbot III (steel), Ernie Newton (bass) and Tommy Waden (fiddle). With the production of Stephen Sholes, the song was released in May 1950, on August 19, 1950, it reached number # 1 on the
Music · 10/15/2019
“She's Not the Cheatin 'Kind”, a song written by Ronnie Dunn, and recorded by the country music duo Brooks & Dunn for the Arista label, recorded in June 1994, at Soundshop Studio, 1307 Division St., Nashville, TN, The duo was accompanied at the recording session by: Brent Mason (electric guitar), Bruce C. Bouton (steel), Glenn Worf (bass guitar), Lonnie Wilson (drums and percussion), John Jarvis (Steinway piano and Hammond B- 3 organ) and Bill LaBounty, John Wesley Ryles, Harry Stinson and Denni
Music · 10/15/2019
“Sticks and Stones”, a song written by Roger Dillon and Elbert West, was recorded by Tracy Lawrence for the Atlantic label, was recorded in August 1991, at Eleven-Eleven Studio, Nashville, TN, Tracy was accompanied at the recording session by: Mark Casstevens (acoustic guitar and harmonica), Brent Rowan (electric guitar), Bruce Bouton (steel), Glenn Worf (bass and background vocals), James Stroud / and Milton Sledge (drums), Joe Spivey (fiddle), Gary W. Smith (piano, keyboards and synthesizer) a
Music · 10/15/2019
Homer Joy was a composer from Arkansas, who was contacted by the Buck Owens office in 1972. They wanted me to compose songs in the style of Hank Williams, to record an album, A Homer did not like the idea, he wanted to be the same and not to compose like Hank. He said he would think about it. Finally, he said yes, with the proviso that they let him record some of his songs. They said yes, but every day he came to the studio, and he was always busy, tired of this situation, that same night he wen
Music · 10/15/2019
Don’t We All Have the Right, a song written by Roger Miller, was recorded by Ricky Van Shelton for the Columbia label, was recorded on October 15, 1986, along with two other songs, in Nashville, TN, at the recording session Ricky was accompanied by: Don Potter (acoustic guitar), Larry Byrom (acoustic guitar), Richard Bennett (guitar), Steve Buckingham (guitar), Steve Gibson (electric guitar), Dennis Burnside (piano), Paul Franklin and Sonny Garrish (steel), David Hungate, Tom Robb and Michael Rh
Music · 10/15/2019
Is a song written by humorist and poet Shel Silverstein and made popular by Johnny Cash. Cash recorded the song live in concert on February 24, 1969 at California’s San Quentin State Prison for his At San Quentin album. Cash also performed the song (with comical variations on the original performance) in December 1969 at Madison Square Garden. The live San Quentin version of the song became Cash’s biggest hit on the Billboard Hot 100 chart and his only top ten single there, spending three weeks
Music · 10/15/2019
This traditional cowboy classic became Rex Allen’s signature song in the 1950s after he made what many feel is the best recording ever made of it. He recorded it for Decca Records in October, 1955, with Victor Young directing the orchestra, and when Rex completed the song, the orchestra stood up and applauded!
Music · 10/15/2019
This song, “Cowboy’s Lament,” had its origins in Ireland in the early 1800’s in a song called “The Unfortunate Rake.” When it made its way to the Western US, the theme, lyrics and title changed to “Cowboy’s Lament” or “Streets of Laredo,” to better fit the new locale. In 1876, a cowboy in Kansas named F.H. Maynard wrote the lyrics we know today, and the song became one of the best-known of all traditional cowboy songs. It was one of the first songs recorded by Burl Ives, one of the country’s m

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